Alexis Grant of USNews.com wrote an intriguing article based on her interview with Scott Gerber entitled “Why New Graduates Should Consider Entrepreneurship.” Scott Gerber is the founder of “The Young Entrepreneur Council” and video-production company “Sizzle It.” Gerber advocates the efforts of ‘Treps and argues that it is a good time for college grads to venture for themselves.

Grant states that “more people worked for themselves in 2010 than during each of the previous fifteen years.” The obvious reason Gerber states is that “Job numbers are terrible, youth employment especially is in the toilet.” However, he adds “I don’t think [entrepreneurship] has ever gone away and had a resurgence. I think it’s been a steady increase for decades.” Gerber offers tips to startups to keep hefty costs at bay:

  • virtual office vs. brick and mortar office
  • utilize theYEC.org (a help desk for young entrepreneurs)
  • simple and scalable business vs. a complex and time-consuming start
  • scaling back your business vs. relying on an expensive loan

At the age of twenty-seven, Scott Gerber has seen his fair share of failure and success as a serial entrepreneur. His first venture led him to a tragic scene of bankruptcy with only $700 left to his name. He took his downfalls as an education and built his success on the ashes of his first venture. Gerber took the last of his money and formed “Sizzle It,” a company that focuses on sizzle reel production for PR and brand marketing. With “Sizzle It,” he ran his business more frugally with a clearer target demographic. And consequently, he realized profitability.

He says entrepreneurs must “remove [their] ego from the equation entirely.” Gerber says a company is not about glitz and glamour, but about success and sustenance. He argues against the traditional idea that one must get workforce experience before endeavoring for themselves and states, “I’ve seen corporate people who try to run their startups like the corporate background they come from, and those fail miserably. Because they’re expecting somebody’s internal budget to cover [costs]… Those kinds of mentalities do not translate.” In reference to structure, Scott says “Every day is truly different… I find solace in trying to be extremely organized and just roll with the punches.” Scott may be atypical in his methods and structure, but you cannot argue with his resilience and acquired success.

The New York Times stated, “Mr. Gerber, now 27, isn’t a millionaire, but he’s paid off his loans and doesn’t have to live with his parents.” Inspirest.com asked Scott what his idea of success was and Scott responded, “For me, it’s not a monetary value. I think that right now, if I can take my experience, and the experience of others, and help educate young people on how they can become the most entrepreneurial generation in history, then I will continue to be successful.”

See Alexis Grant’s article on USNews.com